Library Jawn

This is a jawn about libraries
by Poliana Irizarry

Feb 7
jennafreedman:

kellymce:

So, I’m filling out the “you went to Midwinter, how was it?” survey from ALA, and voila question 30, about what you wanna see in the Exhibit Hall. So, just a little plug, in case you’re also filling out this survey. I mean, where *don’t* you want to see zines?
The Zine Pavilion will be in booth 1731 in Vegas, FYI. 


Whut? Whoa!

jennafreedman:

kellymce:

So, I’m filling out the “you went to Midwinter, how was it?” survey from ALA, and voila question 30, about what you wanna see in the Exhibit Hall. So, just a little plug, in case you’re also filling out this survey. I mean, where *don’t* you want to see zines?

The Zine Pavilion will be in booth 1731 in Vegas, FYI. 

Whut? Whoa!


Feb 6
tumblarianproblems:

Looking forward to tomorrow’s #TumblarianProblems webinar! 
Stay tuned for updates between 1:30-3pm cst.

tumblarianproblems:

Looking forward to tomorrow’s #TumblarianProblems webinar!

Stay tuned for updates between 1:30-3pm cst.


Jan 31


Jan 30

erikkwakkel:

Siamese twins

The bookbindings above are as odd as they are rare. In fact, I encountered my first only a few days ago while browsing Folger Library’s image database of bookbindings. The binding is called “dos-à-dos” (back to back), a type almost exclusively produced in the 16th and 17th centuries. They are like Siamese twins in that they present two different entities joint at their backs: each part has one board for itself, while a third is shared between the two. Their contents show why this was done: you will often find two complementary devotional works in them, such as a prayerbook and a Psalter, or the Bible’s Old and New Testament. Reading the one text you can flip the “book” to consult the other. The last image above is a unification of no less than seven devotional works printed by the same printer (Feichtinger, Lintz, 1736-1737), showing that the constructions could also encompass much more than just two texts. In the 20th century this type of binding enjoyed a revival with the Double Ace books, which featured two short science fiction stories.

Pics: St Andrew’s University Library, Bib BS2085.C27 (top); Washington, Folger Shakespeare Library, STC 23811.2 (two pics), STC 2907 (broidery); Chetham’s Library, shelfmark unknown (editions from 1629, 1633); Ed. J. M. Feichtinger, Lintz, 1736-1737 (from this sales catalogue). Other examples from the Folger here. A nice one auctioned off at Christie’s here.


Jan 29

Jan 28

enoqi:

→ 360° Book Sweet Home, by Yusuke Oono:
The initial idea of this 360 degree book is to express one scene of story in 3 dimensional way using a whole page of book. With this system, everyone who opens the book can enjoy it and is surprised by the dramatic transformation.


Jan 27
A photo of a chalkboard reading, “‘Real’ Books NEVER Die!!” with a graphic of a dying mobile electronic device battery.

So I guess they’ve never played Rock-Paper-Scissors…?

A photo of a chalkboard reading, “‘Real’ Books NEVER Die!!” with a graphic of a dying mobile electronic device battery.

So I guess they’ve never played Rock-Paper-Scissors…?



Nov 22