Library Jawn

This is a jawn about libraries
by Poliana Irizarry

Sep 17

banji-realness:

breelifts:

socialjusticekoolaid:

Protesters from across St Louis turned up and turned out for the first St Louis County Council Meeting since Mike Brown’s Death. (Part I)

The St Louis County Council wasn’t as bad as Ferguson’s Council, but still very few answers and virtually no accountability from the folks who unleashed unholy hell on the residents of Ferguson, following Brown’s murder. #staywoke #farfromover

KEEP POSTING I NEED TO KNOW! DONT STOP POSTING ABOUT THIS. IT IS NOT OVER!

Arrest Darren Wilson and all cops who extrajudicially execute black people!

(via xtinathegreat)


Sep 10
brujacore:

comicsalliance:

CARTOONISTS OF COLOR DATABASE AIMS TO GIVE ARTISTS GREATER VISIBILITY
The Cartoonists of Color Database is a new project by cartoonist MariNaomi that aims to collect information on people of color working in comics. The FAQ succinctly outlines the need for such a database with four statements: “For visibility. For academia. For inspiration. For community building.”
The database formally launched this week with over 700 creator listings, and MariNaomi has made a public call for people to add more information, refine the information that’s currently there, and correct any mistakes.
Artists who want to submit their names to the database can do so via this Google Doc form. That form can also be used to update erroneous information, or anything that’s listed as N/A. In addition to the master list of cartoonists of color, the site has separate lists specifically breaking out LGBTQ, non-male, and non-mainstream cartoonists of color.
READ MORE

I am honored to be included here, alongside a bunch of my faves (◡ ‿ ◡ ✿)

brujacore:

comicsalliance:

CARTOONISTS OF COLOR DATABASE AIMS TO GIVE ARTISTS GREATER VISIBILITY

The Cartoonists of Color Database is a new project by cartoonist MariNaomi that aims to collect information on people of color working in comics. The FAQ succinctly outlines the need for such a database with four statements: “For visibility. For academia. For inspiration. For community building.”

The database formally launched this week with over 700 creator listings, and MariNaomi has made a public call for people to add more information, refine the information that’s currently there, and correct any mistakes.

Artists who want to submit their names to the database can do so via this Google Doc form. That form can also be used to update erroneous information, or anything that’s listed as N/A. In addition to the master list of cartoonists of color, the site has separate lists specifically breaking out LGBTQ, non-male, and non-mainstream cartoonists of color.

READ MORE

I am honored to be included here, alongside a bunch of my faves (◡ ‿ ◡ ✿)


Sep 8

jennafreedman:

malindalo:

diversityinya:

Diversity in YA’s 2014 Back to School Giveaway

It’s September, which means we’re back to business as usual here at DiYA and many of you are back to school! To celebrate the fall, we’re giving away these nine awesome new and upcoming diverse young adult books to three lucky winners.

Here’s how this will work:

1. We’ve divided these nine books into three packs of three:

Prize Pack 1: Thriller/Science Fiction

Prize Pack 2: Realistic Fiction

Prize Pack 3: Nonfiction

2. We will pick three winners to receive one prize pack each. (You can tell us which prize pack you prefer in the entry form.)

3. Because of the cost of international shipping, we are only able to ship to U.S. mailing addresses. International folks may enter as long as they have a U.S. mailing address.

4. Teachers and librarians get an extra entry for free!

5. The deadline to enter is the end of the day, Sept. 19, 2014.

Enter here:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

If you can’t see the entry form widget above, go here to enter.

Thank you to Arthur A. Levine Books; Cinco Puntos; Harlequin Teen; Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; and Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers for generously donating copies of these books for this giveaway.

If you haven’t yet entered DiYA’s fall giveaway, you still have time. Good luck!

4. Teachers and librarians get an extra entry for free!”


Sep 6
queerfucker:

fedupfestchicago:

roycevomit:

Awhile back I stumbled onto this zine written by a radical butch trans dyke in 1997 and I just managed to find it again!
It was mostly written by a lady named anne tagonist and features her experiences at a woman only anarcha-feminist space, rants on trans monstrosity and an article by another butch trans woman on butchness in relation to transness. Another article touches on classism in trans woman narratives (!!). It also has a thing about a trans punk band named bitch hips and some comix and stuff.
Overall it’s pretty neat and super validating to have a cultural document that asserts we’ve been doing this shit for awhile!
You can download it here
Important note: As this was written 17 years ago, it has a lot of outdated / now offensive language in it. 

Check out this fucking awesome old zine from a Chicago punk trans dyke.

UMMM TOO FUCKING COOL

queerfucker:

fedupfestchicago:

roycevomit:

Awhile back I stumbled onto this zine written by a radical butch trans dyke in 1997 and I just managed to find it again!

It was mostly written by a lady named anne tagonist and features her experiences at a woman only anarcha-feminist space, rants on trans monstrosity and an article by another butch trans woman on butchness in relation to transness. Another article touches on classism in trans woman narratives (!!). It also has a thing about a trans punk band named bitch hips and some comix and stuff.

Overall it’s pretty neat and super validating to have a cultural document that asserts we’ve been doing this shit for awhile!

You can download it here

Important note: As this was written 17 years ago, it has a lot of outdated / now offensive language in it. 

Check out this fucking awesome old zine from a Chicago punk trans dyke.

UMMM TOO FUCKING COOL

(via transascendant)


la-rinascente:

Instead of leaking celebrity photos we could leak pdf versions of college textbooks? Idk just an idea

(via pearlsnapbutton)


blackfemalepresident:

old ass ppl talk shit about my generation until they accidentally disable their wifi and cant figure out how to turn it back on

then im suddenly the mastermind of information & resources

(via xtinathegreat)


rustboro-city:

svviggle:

kastortheunlockable:

stunningpicture:

My 7 year old son was shot down by his 1st grade teacher

The american public education system in a nutshell tho

My third grade teacher actually had a conversation with my mom that I was reading to well and told her to stop having me read at home

My first grade teacher said that it was problematic that I was reading ahead of the rest of the kids in my grade and asked my parents to stop letting me read Harry Potter.
My fourth grade teacher thought it was wrong for my dad to be teaching me complex math because it fascinated me.
My elementary school music teacher hated the way my piano teacher taught me, and how I was more advanced than many of her students, and so told me, in front of my peers and my mother, that I was not good enough to participate in the state solo festival. She would not give me the form. We had to procure it from the district instead. She also hated how I excelled at reading and playing music for the recorder, and so she refused to give me my “belts” (colored beads to signify our level) and humiliated me in front of the class repeatedly.
My eighth grade algebra teacher used to fail me on take home tests because I didn’t solve problems exactly the way she showed us in class; I used methods that we had learned for other types of problems that also applied to these. She took points off my tests because I didn’t bring a calculator even though I got 100% without it, because I was able to do it by hand. I had to call my father, who is an engineer, down to the school to shout her down and give me back my A in the class.
My 10th grade Spanish teacher yelled at me in front of the class numerous times because she didn’t like the way I took notes; she thought that since I didn’t write every word off the slide, I wasn’t getting it all down. I had to explain to her that people who have taken advanced courses, like AP or IB classes, know that in a fast-paced learning environment you need to take quick shorthand notes that contain the necessary information rather than wasting time writing every word. She almost gave me detention.
My 11th grade English teacher gave me a poor mark on my first short essay because she believed that I was looking up unnecessarily complex words in a thesaurus to try and get better marks. The phrases in question: “laced with expletives” and “bombarded”. She wouldn’t hear any defense from me.
My 11th grade history teacher failed me on an essay about the 1950s because I misread the prompt. Except the prompt wasn’t words; it was a political cartoon. One of the figures was clearly president Eisenhower, but the other I couldn’t place. My teacher would not tell us who it was. I labelled him as the governor of Little Rock Arkansas during the integration period, and wrote an essay about that subject. My teacher said that no, it was Joseph McCarthy, and that there was a small picture of the man in our textbook and therefore I should have recognized him instantly. Half the class, apparently, did not.
The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win.

rustboro-city:

svviggle:

kastortheunlockable:

stunningpicture:

My 7 year old son was shot down by his 1st grade teacher

The american public education system in a nutshell tho

My third grade teacher actually had a conversation with my mom that I was reading to well and told her to stop having me read at home

My first grade teacher said that it was problematic that I was reading ahead of the rest of the kids in my grade and asked my parents to stop letting me read Harry Potter.

My fourth grade teacher thought it was wrong for my dad to be teaching me complex math because it fascinated me.

My elementary school music teacher hated the way my piano teacher taught me, and how I was more advanced than many of her students, and so told me, in front of my peers and my mother, that I was not good enough to participate in the state solo festival. She would not give me the form. We had to procure it from the district instead. She also hated how I excelled at reading and playing music for the recorder, and so she refused to give me my “belts” (colored beads to signify our level) and humiliated me in front of the class repeatedly.

My eighth grade algebra teacher used to fail me on take home tests because I didn’t solve problems exactly the way she showed us in class; I used methods that we had learned for other types of problems that also applied to these. She took points off my tests because I didn’t bring a calculator even though I got 100% without it, because I was able to do it by hand. I had to call my father, who is an engineer, down to the school to shout her down and give me back my A in the class.

My 10th grade Spanish teacher yelled at me in front of the class numerous times because she didn’t like the way I took notes; she thought that since I didn’t write every word off the slide, I wasn’t getting it all down. I had to explain to her that people who have taken advanced courses, like AP or IB classes, know that in a fast-paced learning environment you need to take quick shorthand notes that contain the necessary information rather than wasting time writing every word. She almost gave me detention.

My 11th grade English teacher gave me a poor mark on my first short essay because she believed that I was looking up unnecessarily complex words in a thesaurus to try and get better marks. The phrases in question: “laced with expletives” and “bombarded”. She wouldn’t hear any defense from me.

My 11th grade history teacher failed me on an essay about the 1950s because I misread the prompt. Except the prompt wasn’t words; it was a political cartoon. One of the figures was clearly president Eisenhower, but the other I couldn’t place. My teacher would not tell us who it was. I labelled him as the governor of Little Rock Arkansas during the integration period, and wrote an essay about that subject. My teacher said that no, it was Joseph McCarthy, and that there was a small picture of the man in our textbook and therefore I should have recognized him instantly. Half the class, apparently, did not.

The American school system is not here to educate us or to encourage us to learn; it’s here to keep us in line and silent. It’s here to keep us from deviating and being our own people and forming our own ideas. Don’t let it win.

(via pearlsnapbutton)