Library Jawn

This is a jawn about libraries
by Poliana Irizarry

Posts tagged books

Nov 24
queenslibrary:

We are heartened by all who, in the face of losing so much after Sandy, have taken the time to return their books—in whatever condition, and just as equally moved by their eagerness to find something new to check out!

queenslibrary:

We are heartened by all who, in the face of losing so much after Sandy, have taken the time to return their books—in whatever condition, and just as equally moved by their eagerness to find something new to check out!


pewinternet:

Why do Americans read? We aim to find out … (http://pewrsr.ch/TEcZRk)


myimaginarybrooklyn:

Margaret Atwood and Naomi Alderman: Why We’re Co-Writing a Zombie Novel
It might seem rather unexpected, but there’s a Deeper Meaning to the zombie craze
Margaret Atwood: It may seem strange that I’m co-writing a serial zombie novel with Naomi Alderman, being posted chapter by chapter on the global story-sharing site, Wattpad. Why Wattpad? Why Naomi? Why zombies?
First, there’s a lot of angst from publishers and writers about the young “not reading”, which may mean they aren’t reading what older people want them to read. My college teacher, Northrop Frye, said you should let the young begin with whatever interests them; and millions of them are interested in Wattpad. Why Naomi? She’s an accomplished novelist and also my Rolex Mentee, and we’re exploring many facets of writing and publishing together.
But in her other life – and, as a self-supporting writer for 40 years, I understand the necessity of second lives – she’s a videogame author, most recently of Zombies Run!, which has seen her and her co-creators funded to develop the prototype for a similar exercise aid by the NHS. So it’s a good fit; and the meaning of the zombie obsession intrigues us both. Naomi has written about it in Granta, I recently made a speech about it at Princeton University. Don’t dismiss the zombies: they have Deeper Meaning. They just don’t know it.
Naomi Alderman: The zombies definitely have a deeper meaning – anything that intrigues and fascinates people has something to tell us about ourselves. So why do I feel defensive about being interested in zombies as well as the evils of fundamentalist religion? About researching mythical monsters as well as the history of the Congo? The hiving off of “fantasy” in bookshops is, and always has been, a nonsense. After all, who wrote about witches, monsters and spells? Homer. Who wrote about fairies, wizards and ghosts? Shakespeare. Zombies can be as serious as any Caliban or Poseidon.
But our zombies aren’t really serious. That’s the pleasure of them. Part of the delight of working on this with Margaret, whose work has influenced and inspired me all my writing life, has been to see that, yes, even serious writers don’t have to be serious all the time. From the first lines Margaret wrote, this has been a black comedy.
We’re still writing the end of the story. I’m holding on to my last chapter because I don’t want this to end; it’s been an exhilarating, hilarious, joyful process. Waiting to get Margaret’s chapter, reading it gleefully, trying to come up with something that might take the story in an unexpected direction or give her a problem to solve. Then waiting again to see what she’s come up with for me. Remembering that writing is storytelling, and storytelling, after all, is play.

myimaginarybrooklyn:

Margaret Atwood and Naomi Alderman: Why We’re Co-Writing a Zombie Novel

It might seem rather unexpected, but there’s a Deeper Meaning to the zombie craze

Margaret AtwoodIt may seem strange that I’m co-writing a serial zombie novel with Naomi Alderman, being posted chapter by chapter on the global story-sharing site, Wattpad. Why Wattpad? Why Naomi? Why zombies?

First, there’s a lot of angst from publishers and writers about the young “not reading”, which may mean they aren’t reading what older people want them to read. My college teacher, Northrop Frye, said you should let the young begin with whatever interests them; and millions of them are interested in Wattpad. Why Naomi? She’s an accomplished novelist and also my Rolex Mentee, and we’re exploring many facets of writing and publishing together.

But in her other life – and, as a self-supporting writer for 40 years, I understand the necessity of second lives – she’s a videogame author, most recently of Zombies Run!, which has seen her and her co-creators funded to develop the prototype for a similar exercise aid by the NHS. So it’s a good fit; and the meaning of the zombie obsession intrigues us both. Naomi has written about it in Granta, I recently made a speech about it at Princeton University. Don’t dismiss the zombies: they have Deeper Meaning. They just don’t know it.

Naomi Alderman: The zombies definitely have a deeper meaning – anything that intrigues and fascinates people has something to tell us about ourselves. So why do I feel defensive about being interested in zombies as well as the evils of fundamentalist religion? About researching mythical monsters as well as the history of the Congo? The hiving off of “fantasy” in bookshops is, and always has been, a nonsense. After all, who wrote about witches, monsters and spells? Homer. Who wrote about fairies, wizards and ghosts? Shakespeare. Zombies can be as serious as any Caliban or Poseidon.

But our zombies aren’t really serious. That’s the pleasure of them. Part of the delight of working on this with Margaret, whose work has influenced and inspired me all my writing life, has been to see that, yes, even serious writers don’t have to be serious all the time. From the first lines Margaret wrote, this has been a black comedy.

We’re still writing the end of the story. I’m holding on to my last chapter because I don’t want this to end; it’s been an exhilarating, hilarious, joyful process. Waiting to get Margaret’s chapter, reading it gleefully, trying to come up with something that might take the story in an unexpected direction or give her a problem to solve. Then waiting again to see what she’s come up with for me. Remembering that writing is storytelling, and storytelling, after all, is play.


Nov 16

zackzook:

Beating out an unusually competitive field, Louise Erdrich won the National Book Award for fiction for “The Round House,” a novel about a teenage boy’s effort to investigate an attack on his mother on a North Dakota reservation, and his struggle to come to terms with the violence in their culture. Ms. Erdrich accepted the award in part in her Native American language. She said she wanted to acknowledge “the grace and endurance of native women.” (source)

(via zackzook)


Oct 24

Aug 22
incidentalcomics:

Stray Books

incidentalcomics:

Stray Books

(via snack-tray)


Jul 20
unconsumption:

mollyblock:

What should I do with these? I can’t decide how I’d like to repurpose them. Maybe make them into a lamp? They’re from my stash of books that once belonged to now-deceased family members. Can you pick out the two very well-worn (and -loved) vintage Nancy Drew books?! And the old Boy Scout Handbooks? (Taken with instagram)

I interrupt our regularly scheduled programming to bring you this special note about using books as raw material for “reuse projects”:
When my Unconsumption colleagues and I (Molly) post ideas that involve the repurposing of books, these are examples of the books I envision using for such projects. Not new books, or books that someone may actually want to read. But books that are well past their reading prime. Regular readers of the Unconsumption blog know this. In fact, we Unconsumptioneers often add caveats — like this one, and this one and this one from Rob — about using unreadable or otherwise unwanted books as raw material.
So, back to the question of what will I do with the books pictured. (In case you’re wondering: The books are from my personal “collection”: the 1940s Scout books and “Treasure Island” were my father’s; the older Nancy Drew book — a 1930 edition of “The Hidden Staircase,” standing upright, with most of its blue spine disintegrated — my mother’s.)
Have you done something with old books — something you think will inspire me to finally do something with these (other than move them from shelf to shelf)? If so, let me know.
Related: I posted this photo via the @Unconsumption Instagram account. If you’re on Instagram and add the tag “#unconsumption“ to photos, I’ll check them out!

unconsumption:

mollyblock:

What should I do with these? I can’t decide how I’d like to repurpose them. Maybe make them into a lamp? They’re from my stash of books that once belonged to now-deceased family members. Can you pick out the two very well-worn (and -loved) vintage Nancy Drew books?! And the old Boy Scout Handbooks? (Taken with instagram)

I interrupt our regularly scheduled programming to bring you this special note about using books as raw material for “reuse projects”:

When my Unconsumption colleagues and I (Molly) post ideas that involve the repurposing of books, these are examples of the books I envision using for such projects. Not new books, or books that someone may actually want to read. But books that are well past their reading prime. Regular readers of the Unconsumption blog know this. In fact, we Unconsumptioneers often add caveats — like this one, and this one and this one from Rob — about using unreadable or otherwise unwanted books as raw material.

So, back to the question of what will I do with the books pictured. (In case you’re wondering: The books are from my personal “collection”: the 1940s Scout books and “Treasure Island” were my father’s; the older Nancy Drew book — a 1930 edition of “The Hidden Staircase,” standing upright, with most of its blue spine disintegrated — my mother’s.)

Have you done something with old books — something you think will inspire me to finally do something with these (other than move them from shelf to shelf)? If so, let me know.

Related: I posted this photo via the @Unconsumption Instagram account. If you’re on Instagram and add the tag “#unconsumption“ to photos, I’ll check them out!


May 18

Apr 27

thelalatheory:

You guys, I might barf. My book is here! It’s “out” now, and available for purchase from the publisher, Microcosm, or from Amazon, and maybe other places too. I’ve also got a couple boxes of copies all for myself, so I’m going to bring some to the reading tomorrow and I think I’ll put some up on my etsy shop as well. They look so pretty, I’m really excited.

Be sure to pick up a copy of White Elephants, the new book from Philly zinester Katie Haegele. (Librarians: purchase it via Microcosm for discount pricing on large orders.)


Apr 25
“I love printed books but other than our sentimentality, why do we have them? Beauty, accessibility to the less fortunate, endurance throughout time. All good reasons. Let’s put those forward and stop being saps about how books smell and feel. Books are vehicles for storytelling, not house pets.”

Countdown to the Muse: Micro-Interview 8 (Kevin Smokler) | grub street daily

A-fucking-men

(via rachelfershleiser)

~~~

There is one - and as far as I can tell, only one - useful aspect of the “smell of the book” argument for printed material. That is, I can immediately discount anything else that person has to say on the subject of books, printed or otherwise.

This quote accurately captures some of the legitimate pro-print arguments. Let’s have the conversation start there.

(via thepinakes)

(via thepinakes)


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