Library Jawn

This is a jawn about libraries
by Poliana Irizarry

Posts tagged librarian

Sep 25
via the always NSFW, always awesome analparade.

via the always NSFW, always awesome analparade.

(via welcometothesalon)


Aug 29
jennyandthelibrarians:

tributaries #2 is now available at quimby’s, online or in person in chicago:
http://www.quimbys.com/store/5304
“Stumbling towards Librarianism, JC gives the rundown of all jobs prior”



I picked up Tributaries 1, 2, & 3 at the Philadelphia Feminist Zine Fest after watching JC read from her work at Wooden Shoe Books the evening before the fest. This issue is the one most directly about librarianship, but I highly recommend all three. 


I’ll do a more focused post about PFZF ASAP, but I’ll leave you with this: I met four librarians and at least one archivist this weekend. Librarians love zines, and zinesters love librarians! Dig.

jennyandthelibrarians:

tributaries #2 is now available at quimby’s, online or in person in chicago:

http://www.quimbys.com/store/5304

Stumbling towards Librarianism, JC gives the rundown of all jobs prior”

I picked up Tributaries 1, 2, & 3 at the Philadelphia Feminist Zine Fest after watching JC read from her work at Wooden Shoe Books the evening before the fest. This issue is the one most directly about librarianship, but I highly recommend all three.

I’ll do a more focused post about PFZF ASAP, but I’ll leave you with this: I met four librarians and at least one archivist this weekend. Librarians love zines, and zinesters love librarians! Dig.


Apr 15
mrfancypantslibrarian:

Frequently Asked Questions (Self-Portrait #41) by taberandrew on Flickr.This is another good librarian t-shirt.  Got any more?

mrfancypantslibrarian:

Frequently Asked Questions (Self-Portrait #41) by taberandrew on Flickr.

This is another good librarian t-shirt. Got any more?


Mar 8
“The Internet to us is not something external to reality but a part of it: an invisible yet constantly present layer intertwined with the physical environment. We do not use the Internet, we live on the Internet and along it. If we were to tell our bildnungsroman to you, the analog, we could say there was a natural Internet aspect to every single experience that has shaped us. We made friends and enemies online, we prepared cribs for tests online, we planned parties and studying sessions online, we fell in love and broke up online. The Web to us is not a technology which we had to learn and which we managed to get a grip of. The Web is a process, happening continuously and continuously transforming before our eyes; with us and through us.”

Web Kids Manifesto: “We, the Web Kids” (via sociolab)
 
THIS is the way educators must view technology! Computers and The Internet are NOT learning tools. They are a part of the environment in which today’s learning takes place! Educational technology is not about doing things better. It’s about doing BETTER THINGS! (via creative-education)

If you’re interested in this and haven’t done so yet, I’d like to push you in the direction of reading some of danah boyd’s work and then follow her references/links/projects to the work of other people, because there’s a wealth of research being done on just this idea and it needs to filter into the minds of everybody who works with kids, whether technology is directly integrated into that work or not.

(via librariesandlemonade)

(via ellenbee)


Feb 29

ofanotherfashion:

Maybe the most stylish librarian ever - check out that fascinator! Lucille Baldwin Brown was the first Black public county librarian in Tallahassee, Florida. This photograph is part of the collection at the State Library and Archives of Florida.


Feb 6
“You don’t have to be a print book person or an e-book person. It’s not an either/or proposition. You can choose to have your text delivered on paper with a pretty cover, or you can choose to have it delivered over the air to your sleek little device. You can even play it way loose and read in both formats! Crazy, right? To have choice. Neither is better or worse — for you, for the economy, for the sake of “responsible self-government.” We should worry less about how people get their books and — say it with me now! — just be glad that people are reading.”

Jonathan Segura, “No More E-Books Vs. Print Books Arguments, OK?” via NPR (via thelibrarianontherun)

—This is correct. I am one of those people who likes it both ways (har, har).

(via thepinakes)

Yes, but I’m gonna take this one step further and say that I don’t give a crap if “people are reading,” either. I have always found that to be the most pompous attitude. Reading is something really important in my life, and I do think it could bring good things to everyone, provided they wanted them. I’ve even done some work to this end, doing adult literacy tutoring with folks who needed some help and encouragement — and believe me, to my surprise and dismay, encouragement was what they needed more than anything; some of the people I met who considered themselves illiterate weren’t at all, they had a comparable level of reading comprehension to some of the over-validated people I grew up with but were down on their luck and mistreated by the “system” that is our lives. Furthermore, since I write stuff myself I’d like it if some people read it. But it’s not upon me to be GLAD about other people’s interests and hobbies. Maybe it’s just the phrasing of that idea that I find smug and superior. I don’t know, I might just be crabby because I’ve had a migraine all morning. Bye!

(via thelalatheory)

Reposted for commentary challenging the idea that we should “just be glad that people are reading.”

(via space-museum-deactivated2014070)


Feb 3

Feb 2

When the web started, I used to get really grumpy with people because they put my poems up. They put my stories up. They put my stuff up on the web. I had this belief, which was completely erroneous, that if people put your stuff up on the web and you didn’t tell them to take it down, you would lose your copyright, which actually, is simply not true.

And I also got very grumpy because I felt like they were pirating my stuff, that it was bad. And then I started to notice that two things seemed much more significant. One of which was… places where I was being pirated, particularly Russia where people were translating my stuff into Russian and spreading around into the world, I was selling more and more books. People were discovering me through being pirated. Then they were going out and buying the real books, and when a new book would come out in Russia, it would sell more and more copies. I thought this was fascinating, and I tried a few experiments. Some of them are quite hard, you know, persuading my publisher for example to take one of my books and put it out for free. We took “American Gods,” a book that was still selling and selling very well, and for a month they put it up completely free on their website. You could read it and you could download it. What happened was sales of my books, through independent bookstores, because that’s all we were measuring it through, went up the following month three hundred percent

I started to realize that actually, you’re not losing books. You’re not losing sales by having stuff out there. When I give a big talk now on these kinds of subjects and people say, “Well, what about the sales that I’m losing through having stuff copied, through having stuff floating out there?” I started asking audiences to just raise their hands for one question. Which is, I’d say, “Okay, do you have a favorite author?” They’d say, “Yes.” and I’d say, “Good. What I want is for everybody who discovered their favorite author by being lent a book, put up your hands.” And then, “Anybody who discovered your favorite author by walking into a bookstore and buying a book raise your hands.” And it’s probably about five, ten percent of the people who actually discovered an author who’s their favorite author, who is the person who they buy everything of. They buy the hardbacks and they treasure the fact that they got this author. Very few of them bought the book. They were lent it. They were given it. They did not pay for it, and that’s how they found their favorite author. And I thought, “You know, that’s really all this is. It’s people lending books. And you can’t look on that as a loss of sale. It’s not a lost sale, nobody who would have bought your book is not buying it because they can find it for free.”

What you’re actually doing is advertising. You’re reaching more people, you’re raising awareness. Understanding that gave me a whole new idea of the shape of copyright and of what the web was doing. Because the biggest thing the web is doing is allowing people to hear things. Allowing people to read things. Allowing people to see things that they would never have otherwise seen. And I think, basically, that’s an incredibly good thing.

Neil Gaiman on Copyright, Piracy, and the Commercial Value of the Web (X)

Hard-hearted librariansoul is tearing up over here. *sniffle*

(via librariansoul)

Italics mine, added to draw attention to the connection to internet “piracy” and free lending libraries.

(via librariansoul)


katchin05:

dfxm326:

Long before multicultural characters and themes were commonplace, Ezra Jack Keats crossed social boundaries by being the first American picture-book maker to give black children a central place in children’s literature.The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats; 1962


I had ALL the Ezra Jack Keats books growing up, and routinely buy them as gifts for my friend’s baby showers/children’s birthdays. I’m particularly fond of Hi Cat.

katchin05:

dfxm326:

Long before multicultural characters and themes were commonplace, Ezra Jack Keats crossed social boundaries by being the first American picture-book maker to give black children a central place in children’s literature.

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats; 1962



I had ALL the Ezra Jack Keats books growing up, and routinely buy them as gifts for my friend’s baby showers/children’s birthdays. I’m particularly fond of Hi Cat.